A World of Customers Is Waiting to Read Your Website in Their Language

Many companies take it for granted that the majority of web content today is in English. Consequently, businesses reason that there isn’t a big demand for a localized version of their website or products. At this point, though, the cost of translation is far surpassed by the cost of not translating.

Research shows that 70 percent of Internet users aren’t native English speakers, and according to Common Sense Advisory, 75 percent of Internet users do not make important purchasing decisions unless the product description is in a language they can speak.

Given the evidence that customers prefer to engage with websites that are in their native languages, it’s surprising that almost half of Fortune 500 companies haven’t translated web content into more than one language.

Part of the issue may be that companies don’t know where to start or what a localization project will cost. If the website is 10,000 pages or you’re translating collateral like videos, brochures and email newsletters, building a business case for translation can be a little overwhelming. But if you can illuminate the solid ROI benefits of localization, it may be easier to visualize the benefits for the bran and communicate those benefits to all the stakeholders involved.

If you don’t translate the company website, there are a lot of potential customers who won’t even know your brand exists. The companies that are localizing content for new markets are reaping substantial benefits. Internet Retailer reports that when Israeli e-retailer Under.me created a German-language version of the website, the conversion rate for customers in Germany went up from 1 percent to 2 percent. In France, Under.me translated site content into French and conversions rose from 0.67 percent to 1 percent.

Many large corporations already know that localization can pay big dividends. Microsoft has translated products into more than 90 foreign languages and language variants, and now makes a large chunk of revenue from non-US territories. Toshiba has invested heavily in localization, too, having translated in 30 languages. Apple has translated in 40 languages.

Given the expansion of the Internet to nearly every corner of the globe – and every audience’s preference for content in their native language – there’s definitive proof that there’s an audience for localized websites and collateral. There are case studies that show how translating can significantly increase sales in target markets. There’s even proof that the investment in translation is a tiny fraction of department budgets.

For other companies, it might be more of a hard push into a new market. That could involve aligning a brand message and localizing a website, technical documentation and customer support for an overseas launch. Analytics tools can help define which market could be most interested in your products, but it’s up to the company to devise a market entry strategy.

Once that strategy is in place, it’s time to get moving. The opportunity is there. It’s just up to companies to find the brand’s next big market and start talking that audience’s language.

Contact us – Asian Trust Translation can help you to translate your website into every language!!!

2 Comments

  1. Jessica Wilson-
    Friday March 11th, 2016 at 10:16 AM

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    Friday March 11th, 2016 at 10:23 AM

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